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GOLDVARG COLLECTION

          P.O.Box 268731

    Weston, Florida 33326

   United States of America

info@goldvargcollection.com

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© 1988-2019 by GOLDVARG COLLECTION

The 1970 Impala got a minor facelift featuring a more conventional bumper under the grill replacing the wrap-around unit used in 1969 and new triple vertical taillights. Fiberglass-belted tires on 15-inch (380 mm) wheels were made standard equipment along with a larger standard 250 hp (186 kW) 350 cubic-inch Turbo Fire V8, on most models (the 250 cubic-inch six-cylinder engine was now only offered on the 1970 Impala four-door sedan as well that year's lower-line Biscayne and Bel Air four-door sedans). Optional V8s included a 300 hp (220 kW) 350 and a new 265 hp (198 kW) 400 cubic-inch Turbo Fire V8 (not to be confused with Chevrolet's Turbo Jet big-block 402 V8 (essentially a bored out 396) offered on that year's Chevelles and Monte Carlos). At the top of the engine roster, the big block 427 was replaced by a new, longer stroke, 454 cubic-inch Turbo Jet V8 offered in power ratings of 345 hp (257 kW) and 390 hp (290 kW). The 155-horsepower Turbo Thrift six-cylinder, and 250- and 265 hp (198 kW) Turbo Fire engines were designed to use regular gasoline while the 300 hp (220 kW) 350 Turbo Fire and both 454 Turbo Jet engines required premium fuel. A three-speed manual transmission with column shift was standard equipment as in previous years but the floor-mounted four-speed manual with Hurst shifter was dropped from the option list for 1970 as were the Strato bucket seats and center console previously offered on coupes. Automatic transmission options included the two-speed Powerglide on 250 6s and 350 V8s, and three-speed Turbo Hydramatic was available with all engines. Power front disc brakes were standard on the Impala Custom coupe and optional on all other models. The 1970 Impala was one of three remaining Chevrolet convertibles, with only 9,562 were built. Interest in all size rag tops had dwindled. So was the fascination with large sporty cars, prompting abandonment of the Impala Super Sport. Output of full-sized Chevrolets dropped sharply for the 1970 calendar year, below the million mark, partly as a result of a 65-day strike in the fall of 1970 - but that strike affected the production of early 1971 models. Impala sales, as expected, ranked far above other big Chevrolets with 612,800 Impalas built (6,500 six-cylinder and 606,300 V-8s) compared to 92,000 Caprices, 75,800 Bel Airs and 35,400 Biscaynes, plus another 162,000 station wagons for all series.

Right Hand Drive cars were manufactured in Canada for export to some countries such as Australia, UK, etc., until 1969. They used a version of the 1965 Impala dash panel until 1969. Australian models were assembled in Australia from kits as this lessened tax on the cars. A similar arrangement applied in New Zealand although the bodies were supplied from Canada already welded, painted and trimmed.

GC-029 B 1970 Chevrolet Impala Custom Coupe coupe Mulsanne Blue

$104.00Price